Uploading a file to onedrive for business with Python

For a Raspberry Pi project that’ll take a number of pictures of my house for an as of yet unknown period of time I’m sharing my very first Python script with you.

All it has to do is upload all files from a given folder to a given Onedrive for Business path, as obviously the Pi can’t store much data on its tiny SD card. You’ll need to register an azure ad app and give it the appropriate permissions. You’ll have to consent to the application once (url format = https://login.microsoftonline.com/common/adminconsent?client_id={client-id}).

Then the schedule below Python script on your Pi, it will retrieve an Azure token without the need for external libraries, parse the directory and upload everything in it to the given onedrive for business URL, simple as that! It can also be used for Sharepoint or Teams by adjusting the path.

import requests 
import json
directory = r"c:\temp\uploads"
data = {'grant_type':"client_credentials", 
        'resource':"https://graph.microsoft.com", 
        'client_id':'XXXXX', 
        'client_secret':'XXXXX'} 
URL = "https://login.windows.net/YOURTENANTDOMAINNAME/oauth2/token?api-version=1.0"
r = requests.post(url = URL, data = data) 
j = json.loads(r.text)
TOKEN = j["access_token"]
URL = "https://graph.microsoft.com/v1.0/users/YOURONEDRIVEUSERNAME/drive/root:/fotos/HouseHistory"
headers={'Authorization': "Bearer " + TOKEN}
r = requests.get(URL, headers=headers)
j = json.loads(r.text)
print("Uploading file(s) to "+URL)
for root, dirs, files in os.walk(directory):
    for filename in files:
        filepath = os.path.join(root,filename)
        print("Uploading "+filename+"....")
        fileHandle = open(filepath, 'rb')
        r = requests.put(URL+"/"+filename+":/content", data=fileHandle, headers=headers)
        fileHandle.close()
        if r.status_code == 200 or r.status_code == 201:
            #remove folder contents
            print("succeeded, removing original file...")
            os.remove(os.path.join(root, filename)) 
print("Script completed")
raise SystemExit

Import a PBIX to PowerBI using PowerShell

Reading up on the PowerBI API to import PBIX files to the PowerBI service and an example on the actual request I decided to write a PowerShell function to import a PowerBI PBIX file to the PowerBI service.

The PowerBI Import API is quite specific and kept giving me 400’s like:

  • “Bad Request” with no details
  • UnknownError pbi.error exceptionCulprit 1 (loved this one)
  • MultiPartMimeStreamFormatException
  • RequestedFileIsEncryptedOrCorrupted

Eventually I figured out how to import my reports directly into PowerBI, so to help you automate importing your reports into workspaces or directly to customers using PowerShell, I’ll share my PowerShell function with you:

GitLab: Import-PBIXToPowerBI.ps1

Azure AD sign in and audit log retention

Often we, as cloud admins, need our audit or sign in logs. Usually, we need real-time data because, for example, we’re debugging why that one user has conditional access issues. But sometimes, we need to go back further than 30 days. And that is not something Azure does by default, but can be enabled:


Our options when exporting logs are limited to a Storage account, Log Analytics or an Event Hub. All these options offer multiple extraction methods to cover your transport needs to other systems. The default retention period is then forever, which is nice as we might need audit info going back a bit as hacks are usually discovered after about 206 days.

If you don’t have specific tools or requirements, I recommend setting up a Log Analytics workspace and connecting that to Azure AD:

Whichever method you choose, a P1 or P2 license is required. You only need a single license for the entire tenant when using the export audit / singin log functionality of AzureAD. Once configured, the Logs option directly bring you to the Log Analytics workspace search results:

I’ve briefly shown how to configure AzureAD to send audit and sign in logs to Log Analytics so you can go back further than 30 days. Stay tuned for the next post that will utilize these logs to dive deeper into Guest User activity.

Devices that lack a bitlocker recovery key in AzureAD

With Intune’s new Bitlocker Encryption Report administrators have an effective way of seeing which of their devices have been encrypted.

But if we want to know if we can actually recover the bitlocker key of a device, we need to know if it was ever uploaded to AzureAD.

Network or local device issues can sometimes prevent the recovery key from reaching AzureAD, resulting in lost data if the device’s disk needs to be recovered for any reason. To hunt down devices that have not escrowed their recovery key to AzureAD, you can use my report function (in PowerShell as always):

GitLab source download link