Category Archives: AzureAD

Automated Stale Device Cleanup in Azure Active Directory using a runbook

As with cleaning up inactive guest users, inactive devices also pose several issues for organizations.

Microsoft recommends cleaning up stale devices after 90 days, but does not provide a service option or automation to do so.

Therefore, another runbook you may run to just report on your inactive devices, or to automatically (and optionally periodically) clean up inactive devices in your environment when the removeInactiveDevices switch is supplied.

Managed identity

When run locally, interactive sign in is required. When running as a runbook in Azure automation, the Managed Identity of the automation account is leveraged. This requires you to set Device.ReadWrite.All or Device.Read.All permissions depending on if you want to script to do the cleanup as well.

Autopilot / on premises devices

Note that the script will log an error (and not attempt to delete the device) when a device is an autopilot record (not a real device) or when the device is synced from an on-premises active directory.

Download

Download get-AzureADInactiveDevices.ps1 from Gitlab

Disclaimer

As always, the script is provided as-is and should be reviewed and then used at your own risk.

Guest User Last Sign-in date time in Azure Active Directory and automatic cleanup

Azure AD’s sign in logs also only go back 30 days, which makes it highly recommended to stream Azure AD’s sign in logs to a Log Analytics workspace (Azure Monitor). You just need one single P1 license in your tenant to be able to enable this.

However, even if you don’t stream your sign in logs, Microsoft does keep track of when an account last signed in.

My script gets the last sign in data of all guest accounts in your tenant, without any dependencies other than the Az PS module.

If a guest user has never signed in, the creationDate is used to determine inactivity. Otherwise either the last interactive or last non interactive sign in is used (whichever is most recent).

Additionally, the script can also be configured to automatically clean up any guest accounts that have been inactive for a given number of days by using the -removeInactiveGuests switch.

Even in large environments, processing only takes a few minutes at most.

Download

Download the script from my Gitlab here:

https://gitlab.com/Lieben/assortedFunctions/-/blob/master/get-AzureAdInactiveGuestUsers.ps1

Limitations

Microsoft started using these properties in april 2020, so accounts active before that will seem like they have never been active.

Scheduling

This script supports running non-interactive as a runbook in Azure Automation if you supply the -nonInteractive switch. Before this will work, you’ll have to enable Managed Identity on your automation account and run a small script to assign graph permissions to the Managed Identity: AuditLog.Read.All and Organization.Read.All

Disclaimer

As always this script is provided as-is and should be reviewed and then used at your own risk.

Inviting an external user to a PowerApp programmatically

Another week, another use case for Managed Identities in Automation Accounts!

The scenario today concerns a PowerApp and connected resources that should be shared with external identities, automatically of course. For each user this requires a guest account in the host / resource tenant, and a license. The license can be applied in the home tenant of the guest, or in your tenant.

Key points:

  1. Runbook that invites a user and adds the resulting guest account to a security group
  2. Security group gives access to the PowerApp and underlying (SpO) resources, and uses Group Based Licensing to license the guest for PowerApps and Sharepoint Online
  3. Logic App that is triggered by the PowerApp (trigger on create item in a sharepoint list), and starts the runbook
  4. When the invited user (guest) redeems the invitation, they are directed to a Sharepoint page first so Sharepoint syncs their profile. Otherwise, the PowerApp will not have access to any lists in Sharepoint Online as Guests are not synced to SpO until they access SpO directly.

I may demo the PowerApp, Logic App and Sharepoint lists at some point, but the main thing I wanted to share today is the Azure Runbook that creates the Guest invitation and adds the Guest to a security group using the Managed Identity of the Automation account, instead of service accounts or other pre-2021 solutions:

https://gitlab.com/Lieben/assortedFunctions/-/blob/master/invite-guestUser.ps1

Expanding Microsoft First Party Application Permissions in AzureAD

Connect-AzAccount and my own silent token function use the Microsoft built in client ID of “1950a258-227b-4e31-a9cf-717495945fc2”.

The resulting token has some openID scopes and most backend calls use RBAC, but I wanted to experiment by adding OAuth2 permissions and app roles to it so I can use the context/cached refresh token to also call other Microsoft API’s.

I discovered that this can be done by adding the client to your AzureAD as an SPN (Enterprise Application):

$spn = New-AzureADServicePrincipal -AppId "1950a258-227b-4e31-a9cf-717495945fc2" -DisplayName "Microsoft Azure PowerShell"

Since this is Microsoft owned app, you’ll actually see that show up in AzureAD:

Next, we can add the AuditLog.Read.All permission to the local instance of this app ($spn), this is a Graph permission, so we first need to get the resourceId of graph in our tenant:

$GraphServicePrincipal = Get-AzureADServicePrincipal -Filter "appId eq '00000003-0000-0000-c000-000000000000'"

Then we prepare our post body for the Graph API to add the AuditLog.Read.All permission to Microsoft Azure PowerShell:

        $patchBody = @{
            "clientId"= $spn.ObjectId
            "consentType"= "AllPrincipals"
            "principalId"= $Null
            "resourceId"= $GraphServicePrincipal.ObjectId
            "scope"= "AuditLog.Read.All"
            "expiryTime" = "2022-05-05T09:00:00Z"
        }

Then we’ll grab a token for the Graph API:

$token =  get-azResourceTokenSilentlyWithoutModuleDependencies -userUPN myupn@lieben.nu

And call Graph to add the permission to our local instance of Microsoft Azure PowerShell:

Invoke-RestMethod -Method POST -body ($patchBody | convertto-json) -Uri "https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/oauth2PermissionGrants" -Headers @{"Authorization"="Bearer $token"} -ContentType "application/json"

Any future tokens you grab for graph.microsoft.com using 1950a258-227b-4e31-a9cf-717495945fc2 as clientId will now contain the AuditLog.Read.All scope as well;

You should also be able to add approles, but since (hopefully) only Microsoft has the client credentials, they won’t do much.

Inspired by a question PrzemyslawKlys asked me 🙂

Scheduled migration / group add script

Usually, I want to roll out new features gradually to my users.

I used to do this by creating a security group, assigning new policies/software/patches etc to it, and then telling the IT staff to add users to it in groups and check with them if things went well.

But why? Why is that manual step needed?

Exactly, it is not!

So attached script can be scheduled in an Azure Automation Account (with Managed Identity enabled!) to add an X amount of users from Group A to Group B. This script can be scheduled to e.g. run daily until all users have been moved. Multiple scheduled would also work in case you’re deploying multiple features.

Handling exceptions

When certain users need to be excluded, simply create an exclusion security group and exclude that from your policies. Exclusions take precedence in most systems.

Grouping users

You can group deployment by supplying the groupByProperty, e.g. by Country

The code

https://gitlab.com/Lieben/assortedFunctions/-/blob/master/add-batchToGroup.ps1

Required modules

  • Az.Accounts

Graph Permissions

You’ll have to give the Managed Identity of your automation account sufficient graph permissions. This cannot be done through the GUI, so I’ve added a snippet you can use here:

https://gitlab.com/Lieben/assortedFunctions/-/blob/master/add-roleToManagedIdentity.ps1

Additionals

You’ll probably want to communicate to your users in advance, it’d be fairly easy to generate a report in advance or to add email notifications to the script but that will require additional graph permissions.