Category Archives: EMS

Deallocate Azure AD Joined Azure Virtual Desktop VMs when a user logs off

When you shut down a VM or log off, the VM isn’t actually deallocated and still costs money.

Bernd wrote a nice guide on how to deallocate a VM when a user logs off, using GPO’s, since combined with Start On Connect the user experience is still pretty decent.

For Intune / Microsoft Endpoint Manager, no solution was known yet. So I base64 encoded Bernd’s solution and wrapped it into a SYSTEM wide scheduled task that is triggered by a security eventlog logoff entry.

Deploy this to your VM’s in Intune (either through a user or a machine group) and it’ll ensure users’ VM’s get deallocated when they log off.

This also works on shared VM’s, as it will only deallocate if it is the last user logging off.

You can download/view set-AVDDeallocateOnLogoff.ps1 here.

(re) configuring hidden VPN Profile properties

Using MEM (Intune) we can automatically deploy VPN profiles to our users’ managed devices directly.

The set of parameters that can be configured in MEM is extremely limited compared to what actually ends up on the rasphone.pbk file (VPN Profile) on a Windows client.

Example of a .pbk file for an Azure P2S VPN connection with Conditional Access/cert based SSO:

[AzureVirtualNetwork]
Encoding=1
PBVersion=6
Type=4
AutoLogon=0
UseRasCredentials=1
LowDateTime=-1117351264
HighDateTime=30942358
DialParamsUID=927022140
Guid=AABC7C8342FD91458105A961BE471F8E
VpnStrategy=7
ExcludedProtocols=8
LcpExtensions=1
DataEncryption=256
SwCompression=1
NegotiateMultilinkAlways=1
SkipDoubleDialDialog=0
DialMode=0
OverridePref=15
RedialAttempts=0
RedialSeconds=0
IdleDisconnectSeconds=0
RedialOnLinkFailure=0
CallbackMode=0
CustomDialDll=
CustomDialFunc=
CustomRasDialDll=%windir%\system32\cmdial32.dll
ForceSecureCompartment=0
DisableIKENameEkuCheck=0
AuthenticateServer=0
ShareMsFilePrint=1
BindMsNetClient=1
SharedPhoneNumbers=0
GlobalDeviceSettings=0
PrerequisiteEntry=
PrerequisitePbk=
PreferredPort=VPN2-0
PreferredDevice=WAN Miniport (IKEv2)
PreferredBps=0
PreferredHwFlow=0
PreferredProtocol=0
PreferredCompression=0
PreferredSpeaker=0
PreferredMdmProtocol=0
PreviewUserPw=0
PreviewDomain=0
PreviewPhoneNumber=0
ShowDialingProgress=0
ShowMonitorIconInTaskBar=1
CustomAuthKey=13
CustomAuthData=314442430D000405C000000020005005C0000001500000014000000A8985D3A65E5E5C4B2D7D66D40C6DD2FB19C5436020001001230FE0006000100FCD02C00
CustomAuthData=3BCB684FDAE6ED1B763A3EDEB989B12C95EFFAFFD330281E75F1C671B03CDD800FF0844797977764005000500
AuthRestrictions=128
IpPrioritizeRemote=0
IpInterfaceMetric=1
IpHeaderCompression=1
IpAddress=0.0.0.0
IpDnsAddress=172.1.230.4
IpDns2Address=172.1.230.5
IpWinsAddress=0.0.0.0
IpWins2Address=0.0.0.0
IpAssign=1
IpNameAssign=2
IpDnsFlags=0
IpNBTFlags=1
TcpWindowSize=0
UseFlags=2
IpSecFlags=0
IpDnsSuffix=
Ipv6Assign=1
Ipv6Address=::
Ipv6PrefixLength=0
Ipv6PrioritizeRemote=1
Ipv6InterfaceMetric=0
Ipv6NameAssign=1
Ipv6DnsAddress=::
Ipv6Dns2Address=::
Ipv6Prefix=0000000000000000
Ipv6InterfaceId=0000000000000000
DisableClassBasedDefaultRoute=1
DisableMobility=0
NetworkOutageTime=0
IDI=
IDR=
ImsConfig=0
IdiType=0
IdrType=0
ProvisionType=0
PreSharedKey=
CacheCredentials=0
NumCustomPolicy=0
NumEku=0
UseMachineRootCert=0
Disable_IKEv2_Fragmentation=0
PlumbIKEv2TSAsRoutes=0
NumServers=0
RouteVersion=1
NumRoutes=0
NumNrptRules=0
AutoTiggerCapable=0
NumAppIds=0
NumClassicAppIds=0
SecurityDescriptor=
ApnInfoProviderId=
ApnInfoUsername=
ApnInfoPassword=
ApnInfoAccessPoint=
ApnInfoAuthentication=1
ApnInfoCompression=0
DeviceComplianceEnabled=0
DeviceComplianceSsoEnabled=0
DeviceComplianceSsoEku=
DeviceComplianceSsoIssuer=
WebAuthEnabled=0
WebAuthClientId=
FlagsSet=0
Options=0
DisableDefaultDnsSuffixes=0
NumTrustedNetworks=0
NumDnsSearchSuffixes=0
PowershellCreatedProfile=0
ProxyFlags=0
ProxySettingsModified=0
ProvisioningAuthority=
AuthTypeOTP=0
GREKeyDefined=0
NumPerAppTrafficFilters=0
AlwaysOnCapable=0
DeviceTunnel=0
PrivateNetwork=0

NETCOMPONENTS=
ms_msclient=1
ms_server=1

MEDIA=rastapi
Port=VPN2-0
Device=WAN Miniport (IKEv2)

DEVICE=vpn
PhoneNumber=azuregateway-12341ef-4922-4edc-a492-589b3e547c58-1ba19cb9ae52.vpn.azure.com
AreaCode=
CountryCode=0
CountryID=0
UseDialingRules=0
Comment=
FriendlyName=
LastSelectedPhone=0
PromoteAlternates=0
TryNextAlternateOnFail=1

Modifying VPN Profile settings

To allow admins further customization of these settings, I’ve written a Proactive Remediation script that can customize any VPN profile property to any value you specify.

In our case, we used it to set IpInterfaceMetric, which defaults to 0, causing ambiguously routed traffic to never prefer the VPN connection (since this is a split tunnel connection). Setting it to 1 resolved our DNS/routing issues to certain private endpoints in our Azure environment.

Code / git link: https://gitlab.com/Lieben/assortedFunctions/-/blob/master/set-vpnConnectionInterfaceMetric.ps1

Automated Stale Device Cleanup in Azure Active Directory using a runbook

As with cleaning up inactive guest users, inactive devices also pose several issues for organizations.

Microsoft recommends cleaning up stale devices after 90 days, but does not provide a service option or automation to do so.

Therefore, here’s another runbook you may run to just report on your inactive devices, or to automatically (and optionally periodically) clean up inactive devices in your environment when the removeInactiveDevices switch is supplied.

Managed identity

When run locally, interactive sign in is required. When running as a runbook in Azure automation, the Managed Identity of the automation account is leveraged. This requires you to set Device.ReadWrite.All or Device.Read.All permissions depending on if you want to script to do the cleanup as well. If doing cleanup, also add the managed identity to the cloud device administrator (Azure AD) role.

Autopilot / on premises devices

Note that the script will log an error (and not attempt to delete the device) when a device is an autopilot record (not a real device) or when the device is synced from an on-premises active directory.

Disable vs Delete

The runbook also has a disable option, in which it will first disable a device and wait a configurable ($disableDurationInDays) period of time before actually deleting a device.

Download

Download get-AzureADInactiveDevices.ps1 from Gitlab

Disclaimer

As always, the script is provided as-is and should be reviewed and then used at your own risk.

Redirecting anything to Onedrive for Business

A while ago I wrote a script that can mount Teams Libraries and then redirect any local folder to them.

In many situations, this solution is a little overkill though, so I’ve also created a second version which simply allows you to redirect any local folder (including variable paths!) to any location in a user’s Onedrive folder.

The configuration is set through the registry, an example file is included.

It can be used as a onetimer or as logonscript, and it can also be used to migrate existing content or create hard links for specific local appdata folders.

Lightweight LAPS solution for INtune (MEM)

Managing local admin accounts using Intune has a lot of quirks, my tele-colleague Rudy Ooms has already written extensively about this. He also wrote a PowerShell solution to rotate a specific local admin’s password and had the genius idea of using Proactive Remediations (a MEM feature) to display passwords to admins, integrated / free in the Intune Console.

However, I felt I needed a more lightweight solution that;

  • does not require/modify registry keys
  • does not store the password locally
  • can encrypt the password if desired
  • does not need separate detection and remediation scripts
  • automatically provisions a local admin account
  • can remove any other local admin accounts if desired
  • can whitelist approved admins or groups from AzureAD or Active Directory
  • is language/locale-agnostic (e.g. ‘Administrators’ vs ‘Administradores’….)

Thus LeanLAPS was born!

To install/use:

1. head into the Proactive Remediations section of MDE and click Create script package:

2. Fill out some details:

3. Download and doublecheck the config of LeanLAPS.ps1 (e.g. configure if other local admins should be removed, what the local admin name should be and the password length). Make sure to use NotePad++ / that the file stays UTF-8 Encoded without a BOM.

4. Set both the detection and remediation script to LeanLAPS.ps1 and run it in 64 bit:

5. Assign to a group and deploy. By default it will run every day, but you can also let it run more or less frequently, which determines how often the password is reset (hourly in below example):

6. Deploy, and then click on the script package:

7. Go to Device status and add both output columns:

Congratulations, you can now see the current local admin passwords for all managed Windows 10 devices!

Note: if you wish to trigger a quick remediation, delete the correct keys under Computer\HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\IntuneManagementExtension\SideCarPolicies\Scripts\Execution and Reports in the client’s registry, then restart the IntuneManagementExtension service and the remediation will re-run within 5 minutes.

8. If you want to display an encrypted password in Intune, generate a public and private key and configure the resulting values in gui.ps1 and leanLAPS.ps1

9. If you don’t want LeanLAPS to remove certain preapproved admins or groups as admin, make sure to configure the $approvedAdmins variable.

RBAC

If you provide e.g. your helpdesk with the correct Intune roles, they will be able to see local admin passwords as reported by above solution:

GUI

The community, in the form of Colton Lacy, also added an optional GUI frontend for LeanLAPS which you could use for e.g. helpdesk staff:

https://gitlab.com/Lieben/assortedFunctions/-/blob/master/leanLAPS/gui.ps1