Category Archives: Powershell

Setting up Okta User -> Office 365 contact synchronisation

Okta natively does not allow you to sync users to Office 365 contacts; they either exist as users in Office 365, or they don’t exist at all.

In hybrid scenarios where you are doing a staged migration to Office 365, or where you simply manage your contacts in Okta, you may want to populate the Global Address List in Office 365 with your Okta users.

I’ve written a simple solution for this, you will require:

  1. Okta Admin Access (to obtain a token)
  2. Office 365 credentials (to write / modify Contacts)
  3. An Azure Subscription (for automation)

The solution will sync your users in Okta to Office 365, take note of the following: Continue reading Setting up Okta User -> Office 365 contact synchronisation

Migrating Public Folders to Office 365 Groups

Recently, I stumbled upon an article detailing how to migrate on-premises (or online) Public Folders to Office 365 Groups

Of course I had to try that out asap 🙂 I used an older script to make a report of my on prem public folders to pick one below 50GB.

It was mostly a breeze and the interface of Office 365 groups allows users to easily search and administer their old Public Folders. We purposely only use them for archive access, where the IM team manages access to the groups holding PF data. I can really recommend this strategy, especially if you can easily split them up in under 50GB sized groups.

I did have one slight error you may run into:

“MigrationTransientException: Couldn‎’t find a request that matches the information provided. Reason: No such request exists in the specified index. –> Couldn‎’t find a request that matches the information provided. Reason: No such request exists in the specified index. “

Reason for this: The source public folder path is incorrect, make sure your CSV is mapped correctly or your batch will spin forever (or at least longer than I had patience), never completing.

 

 

Redirecting My Documents to Box Drive, using Intune (Windows 10 MDM)

One of my customers is doing a full cloud-only pilot of Windows 10, Mobile (MDM) managed through Intune to leverage a least-infrastructure solution worldwide.

They’re using Azure AD, but opted out of Onedrive for Business and are using Box Drive instead.

To encourage their users to actually save data to Box instead of Onedrive or locally, I wrote a little Powershell script (since Intune native PS script deployment isn’t live yet).  This script checks if Box has been configured, if not it throws a little popup to the user. If it has, it redirects My Documents, and copies any existing content from it to Box.

I used Advanced Installer to wrap this in an MSI for easy deployment through Intune, and would like to share this with you 🙂

ZIP download: configureBoxRedirection_v1.02.zip

Zip contents:

  1. ps1 file which does the actual work
  2. vbs wrapper to run it silently (hidden windows)
  3. .aip file (advanced installer)
  4. .msi file (to roll out with Intune or other tools)

Update 10/10:

  1. added a caching mechanism to force Box Drive to locally cache files (normally Box only does this when they are opened)
  2. added a caching filter to prevent caching of files above 25MB to reduce initial bandwidth overhead

Update 04/12:

  1. added a 5 minute loop / wait cycle to allow box to initialize, as the script may otherwise run before Box can initialize

On-Demand MSI customization using Azure Functions

This post describes how you can use the WIX Toolkit or any DLL file in an Azure Function, in this case to edit an MSI file on the fly. The WIX Toolkit is free, but only runs on Windows. Azure Functions run on Windows too, isn’t that nice 🙂

So, an example use case could be my OnedriveMapper MSI file, which is installed with a configuration GUID property by an admin to customize OnedriveMapper. If that GUID was already in the MSI, no such parameter would be necessary.

Using an Azure function in a download link or http request, we could insert a GUID on the fly and create personalized MSI files on demand.

I’ll leave other applications to your imagination, let’s get started!

  1. Download the WIX toolkit (binaries)
  2. Extra Microsoft.Deployment.WindowsInstaller.dll
  3. Add it to the function files or host it at an URL somewhere. In my example, I’m hosting it at http://www.lieben.nu/wix/wix.dll
  4. Add your MSI file to your function files or host it at an URL somewhere. In my example, I’m hosting it at http://www.lieben.nu/wix/OnedriveMapper.msi
  5. Add the following code to the Azure Function:

Continue reading On-Demand MSI customization using Azure Functions

Provisioning Exchange Online / Office 365 Custom Roles automatically from Okta

Natively, when connected to Office 365, Okta allows you to automatically provision users and/or groups. Additionally, Okta will assign licenses you select, and if configured, set predefined roles in Office 365. This means you have one locus of control, very nice.

Then, Exchange Online allows you to define custom roles where you can scope permissions for your users with far greater granularity compared to the default roles, Okta won’t detect or provision users into these custom roles.

As this was a business requirement for a customer, I coded up a small proof of concept you can schedule that will read membership of selected groups in Okta through the Okta API, then ensure that ONLY those members are in the matching role groups in Exchange Online.

Continue reading Provisioning Exchange Online / Office 365 Custom Roles automatically from Okta

Creating a Dynamic Group using the Graph API

Azure has a very nice feature called ‘Dynamic Groups‘. We use these in our customer tenants to dynamically generate a group with actual users, excluding Guest accounts (marked with #EXT#).

As I couldn’t find any articles detailing how to create a Dynamic Group through the Graph API, I’m posting this for whoever it helps 🙂

$dynamicGroupProperties = @{
    "description" = "Dynamic Group Created through the Graph API";
    "displayName" = "Dynamic Group Created through the Graph API";
    "groupTypes" = @("DynamicMembership");
    "mailEnabled" = $False;
    "mailNickname" = "testnickname";
    "membershipRule" = "(user.userPrincipalName -notContains `"#EXT#@`") -and (user.userType -ne `"Guest`")";
    "membershipRuleProcessingState" = "On";
    "securityEnabled" = $True
}

invoke-webrequest -Headers $headerParams -uri "https://graph.microsoft.com/beta/groups" -Body (ConvertTo-Json $dynamicGroupProperties) -method POST -Verbose

If you’re not yet used to working with the Graph API, read up on how to connect to the Graph API using Powershell.

Powershell Lock Function

A handy Powershell function to lock / unlock using .NET, to prevent concurrent read/writes to files or anything else you like.

function handleThreadLock{
    Param(
        [switch]$setLock,
        [switch]$releaseLock,
        [string]$lockName="defaultLockName",
        [int]$timeOut=600
    )
    if($setLock){
        #register a thread lock
        $script:threadLock = New-Object System.Threading.Mutex($false, $lockName)
        $waited = 0
        while($true){
            try{$lockState = $script:threadLock.WaitOne(1000)}catch{$lockState=$False}
            if($lockState){
                break
            }else{
                $waited+=1
                if($waited -gt $timeOut){
                    Throw "failed to get a thread within $timeOut seconds!"
                }
            }
        }
    }  
    if($releaseLock){
        #release a thread lock
        [void]$script:threadLock.ReleaseMutex()
    }  
}

In your script, call it like this:

try{
    handleThreadLock -setLock
}catch{Throw "Failed to set lock!"}

try{
    add-content -Path "c:\yourfile.txt" -Value "log entry" -ErrorAction Stop
}finally{
    handleThreadLock -releaseLock
}

How to retrieve all Okta groups including their members using Powershell

Okta exposes a very useful API, with which I’ve been working for a while to ensure business fit for certain scenario’s that Okta and/or Office 365/Azure don’t fully support yet.

One of those scenario’s requires information about certain groups and their members. I’m narrowing the selection down to just pure Okta groups, but any groups (e.g. AD Synced) can be returned with below code by adjusting the filter in the retrieveAllOktaGroups function.

  1. First, you will need an Okta token to use with Powershell’s REST functions, this is the easiest part.
  2. Okta’s API’s are customer specific, so your $OktaAPIBaseURL parameter should be something like “https://companyname.okta.com”
  3. Run the retrieveAllOktaGroupsAndMembers function below with the token as a parameter
  4. Remember that Okta tokens expire if not used for a while

Continue reading How to retrieve all Okta groups including their members using Powershell

The process cannot access the file ‘C:\Windows\system32\config\systemprofile\AppData\Roaming\Windows Azure Powershell\TokenCache.dat’ because it is being used by another process.

While building some multithreading Azure Runbooks that log into multiple subscriptions simultaneously, I noticed that these multiple concurrent runs often end up on the same Azure Automation Host.

Apparently, these runbooks then don’t run in full isolation, and the following error may occur:

The running command stopped because the preference variable “ErrorActionPreference” or common parameter is set to Stop: The process cannot access the file ‘C:\Windows\system32\config\systemprofile\AppData\Roaming\Windows Azure Powershell\TokenCache.dat’ because it is being used by another process.

AzureProfile.json may also get locked. I resolved this by doing a retry on the Save-AzureRMContext, and using a randomized file name for the azure json profile:


$randomProfileName = [System.IO.Path]::GetRandomFileName()

Save-AzureRmContext -Path .\$randomProfileName -Force -Confirm:$False

And for my full Azure Login code snippet:

$randomProfileName = [System.IO.Path]::GetRandomFileName()
 $tries=0
    while($true){
        $tries++
        try{
            Write-Output "Logging in to Azure $azureSubscription"
            $res = Login-AzureRmAccount -Credential $azureCreds -SubscriptionId $azureSubscription -TenantId $tenantId -ErrorAction Stop
            Select-AzureRmSubscription -SubscriptionId $azureSubscription -ErrorAction Stop -TenantId $tenantId
            if($res.Context.Subscription.Id -eq $azureSubscription){
                Write-Output "Logged in to Azure subscription $($res.Context.Subscription.Id)"
            }else{
                Throw "Failed, we were logged in to $($res.Context.Subscription.Id) while trying to log in to $azureSubscription"
            }
            Save-AzureRmContext -Path .\$randomProfileName -Force -Confirm:$False
            break
        }catch{
            if($tries -ge 30){
                Throw
                Exit
            }
            #sleep on failed attempts, as the azure token cache gets locked by concurrent jobs
            sleep -s (Get-Random -minimum 1 -maximum 6)
        }
    }